Lahaina Public Library

Temporary Hours | Effective February 28, 2022

SundayClosed
MondayClosed
Tuesday 12:00pm-5:00pm
6:00pm-7:00pm
Wednesday9:00am-1:00pm
2:00pm-4:00pm
Thursday9:00am-1:00pm
2:00pm-4:00pm
Friday12:00pm-4:00pm
Saturday9:00am-1:00pm
2:00pm-4:00pm

Address

680 Wharf St, Lahaina, HI 96761, United States
808-662-3950

About

Welcome to the Lahaina Public Library! We opened on Mar. 4, 1956 on the site of a former royal taro patch belonging to King Kamehameha III. Our 19,031 sq. ft. library serves the local community as well as many tourists that visit the area. $280,000 renovation completed in 2012 (no State cost) thanks to Rotary Club of Lahaina, HSPLS, Maui Friends of Library, other donors.


Upcoming events at this branch

Join us! Meet author Sydney Iaukea who will read from Shorelines, Ridges and Seawalls: Saving Olowalu with questions and answers to follow.

One of many wide-ranging essays it pieces together key political controversies that have animated the social and political life of West Maui. The book, Civil Society in West Maui, is a recounting of struggles.

Working within the long shadow cast by the plantation system, and against those who now dominate life in West Maui, the book is concerned with acts of resistance, recovery, and inspiration. There have been amazing people and social movements whose stories must be told. Diverted streams have been restored. Attempts to destroy the landscape have been stopped. Sometimes the successes are grand, while sometimes they are on a smaller scale but have had a lasting impact on our society.

Sometimes the struggles fail in the face of overwhelming political and economic power. The playing field is not level and the less powerful, often local, people are at a disadvantage. But the struggles continue, and West Maui is better for it.

Taken together, the collection of essays offers a mosaic of perspectives on civil society in West Maui. Civil society is complicated and fragmented. There are tactics and resources that can be shared between people and groups: a social value can support several movements; a legal precedent can be used by others who are threatened; a technical access-to-information rule can improve how much people understand what is happening in their community.

Sometimes social movements succeed; sometimes they do not. The editor and writers hope the contribution of Civil Society in West Maui encourages people to recognize that such political activities have taken place—and that the struggles for a just society continue.

An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By visiting and/or participating in library programming, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19. Please help keep each other healthy.

If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library 7 days prior to the program date. We will make every attempt to fulfill all requests for accommodations. All programs are subject to change.

Join us! Meet author Will Caron who will read from essay Access Denied! The Struggle for the Future of West Maui with questions and answers to follow.

In this wide-ranging collection of essays, Civil Society in West Maui pieces together key political controversies that have animated the social and political life of West Maui. The book is a recounting of struggles.

Working within the long shadow cast by the plantation system, and against those who now dominate life in West Maui, the book is concerned with acts of resistance, recovery, and inspiration. There have been amazing people and social movements whose stories must be told. Diverted streams have been restored. Attempts to destroy the landscape have been stopped. Sometimes the successes are grand, while sometimes they are on a smaller scale but have had a lasting impact on our society.

Sometimes the struggles fail in the face of overwhelming political and economic power. The playing field is not level and the less powerful, often local, people are at a disadvantage. But the struggles continue, and West Maui is better for it.

Taken together, the collection of essays offers a mosaic of perspectives on civil society in West Maui. Civil society is complicated and fragmented. There are tactics and resources that can be shared between people and groups: a social value can support several movements; a legal precedent can be used by others who are threatened; a technical access-to-information rule can improve how much people understand what is happening in their community.

Sometimes social movements succeed; sometimes they do not. The editor and writers hope the contribution of Civil Society in West Maui encourages people to recognize that such political activities have taken place—and that the struggles for a just society continue.

An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By visiting and/or participating in library programming, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19. Please help keep each other healthy.

If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library 7 days prior to the program date. We will make every attempt to fulfill all requests for accommodations. All programs are subject to change.

Toys coming out of head

Makerspace, crafting, art, sewing, tinkering, – it all adds up to using your creativity and imagination!  Join us every first Tuesday of the month for this fun, drop in, after school program! Materials, toys and tools will be available to learn, create, explore, collaborate, and share. Materials will vary month to month. Recommended for ages 8 – 16.

An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By visiting and/or participating in library programming, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19. Please help keep each other healthy.

If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library 7 days prior to the program date. We will make every attempt to fulfill all requests for accommodations. All programs are subject to change.

 

Join us! Meet author Kahala Johnson who will read from essay Placed in the Middle: Serving Mana Mahu Maoliness for the Gods in a Wa of Cosmic Emergence with questions and answers to follow.

One of many wide-ranging essays it pieces together key political controversies that have animated the social and political life of West Maui. The book, Civil Society in West Maui, is a recounting of struggles.

Working within the long shadow cast by the plantation system, and against those who now dominate life in West Maui, the book is concerned with acts of resistance, recovery, and inspiration. There have been amazing people and social movements whose stories must be told. Diverted streams have been restored. Attempts to destroy the landscape have been stopped. Sometimes the successes are grand, while sometimes they are on a smaller scale but have had a lasting impact on our society.

Sometimes the struggles fail in the face of overwhelming political and economic power. The playing field is not level and the less powerful, often local, people are at a disadvantage. But the struggles continue, and West Maui is better for it.

Taken together, the collection of essays offers a mosaic of perspectives on civil society in West Maui. Civil society is complicated and fragmented. There are tactics and resources that can be shared between people and groups: a social value can support several movements; a legal precedent can be used by others who are threatened; a technical access-to-information rule can improve how much people understand what is happening in their community.

Sometimes social movements succeed; sometimes they do not. The editor and writers hope the contribution of Civil Society in West Maui encourages people to recognize that such political activities have taken place—and that the struggles for a just society continue.

An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By visiting and/or participating in library programming, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19. Please help keep each other healthy.

If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library 7 days prior to the program date. We will make every attempt to fulfill all requests for accommodations. All programs are subject to change.

storybook

Join us at the Lahaina Public Library (Apuakehau Park) for storytime & activity, and refreshment provided by Starbucks! Just right for elementary-aged children. All children must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

Storytime promotes early literacy and brain development through increased knowledge, vocabulary, imagination, and concentration.

Please bring a towel or small blanket to sit on. Please DO NOT bring umbrellas or lawn chairs. It is hot outside; please wear sunscreen, a shade hat, and bring water. For safety reasons, please stay with your child the entire time.

An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By visiting and/or participating in library programming, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19. Please help keep each other healthy.

If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library at least 7 days prior to the program date. We will make every attempt to fulfill all requests for accommodations. All programs are subject to change. For a list of upcoming library events, visit www.librarieshawaii.org/events

Join us! Meet Cody Kapueola‘ākeanui Pata, a Maui-based kumu hula of Hālau Hula ʻo Ka Malama Mahilani and a classically trained haku mele, Hawaiian language and culture teacher, researcher, consultant, Hawaiian music entertainer, artisan, and lifelong learner.

In Ohuohu nā Mauna o Eeka: Place Names of Maui Komohana, kumu hula Cody Kapueola‘ākeanui Pata gathers together more than 1,600 inoa ‘āina (place name) entries for Maui Komohana—an area of less than 200 square miles that has come to be known as “West Maui.” For Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians), inoa ‘āina have since antiquity served to encode and relay meaningful information across space and time, from one generation to the next. Inoa ‘āina continue to be revered as inseparable from genealogies, individual and collective narratives, mele (poetic verse), and pule (prayers); they persist into modern times as cherished and sacred legacies deserving of deference and appreciation.

The content for Ohuohu nā Mauna o ‘Eeka was compiled from dozens of maps, nineteenth- and twentieth-century Hawaiian- and English-language newspapers, online databases, numerous print publications, archival records, mo‘olelo and mele, recordings of Kanaka Maoli speakers, and information shared directly with the author by his elders, masters, and mentors. Whether one is a genealogical descendant of Maui Komohana, a practitioner of ‘oihana Hawai‘i (Hawaiian professions), or any other manner of scholar, this book is meant to be a resource for all researchers who wish to delve deeper into the toponymy of Maui Komohana.

An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By visiting and/or participating in library programming, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19. Please help keep each other healthy.

If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library 7 days prior to the program date. We will make every attempt to fulfill all requests for accommodations. All programs are subject to change.

Join us! Meet author Ikaika Hussey who will read from essay Preserving West Maui: Sharyn Matin and the Legal Front with questions and answers to follow.

One of many wide-ranging essays it pieces together key political controversies that have animated the social and political life of West Maui. The book, Civil Society in West Maui, is a recounting of struggles.

Working within the long shadow cast by the plantation system, and against those who now dominate life in West Maui, the book is concerned with acts of resistance, recovery, and inspiration. There have been amazing people and social movements whose stories must be told. Diverted streams have been restored. Attempts to destroy the landscape have been stopped. Sometimes the successes are grand, while sometimes they are on a smaller scale but have had a lasting impact on our society.

Sometimes the struggles fail in the face of overwhelming political and economic power. The playing field is not level and the less powerful, often local, people are at a disadvantage. But the struggles continue, and West Maui is better for it.

Taken together, the collection of essays offers a mosaic of perspectives on civil society in West Maui. Civil society is complicated and fragmented. There are tactics and resources that can be shared between people and groups: a social value can support several movements; a legal precedent can be used by others who are threatened; a technical access-to-information rule can improve how much people understand what is happening in their community.

Sometimes social movements succeed; sometimes they do not. The editor and writers hope the contribution of Civil Society in West Maui encourages people to recognize that such political activities have taken place—and that the struggles for a just society continue.

An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By visiting and/or participating in library programming, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19. Please help keep each other healthy.

If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library 7 days prior to the program date. We will make every attempt to fulfill all requests for accommodations. All programs are subject to change.

Join us! Meet author Jacqueline Palmer Lasky who will read from Na Wahine Ho’omau: West Maui Councilwomen with questions and answers to follow.

One of many wide-ranging essays it pieces together key political controversies that have animated the social and political life of West Maui. The book, Civil Society in West Maui, is a recounting of struggles.

Working within the long shadow cast by the plantation system, and against those who now dominate life in West Maui, the book is concerned with acts of resistance, recovery, and inspiration. There have been amazing people and social movements whose stories must be told. Diverted streams have been restored. Attempts to destroy the landscape have been stopped. Sometimes the successes are grand, while sometimes they are on a smaller scale but have had a lasting impact on our society.

Sometimes the struggles fail in the face of overwhelming political and economic power. The playing field is not level and the less powerful, often local, people are at a disadvantage. But the struggles continue, and West Maui is better for it.

Taken together, the collection of essays offers a mosaic of perspectives on civil society in West Maui. Civil society is complicated and fragmented. There are tactics and resources that can be shared between people and groups: a social value can support several movements; a legal precedent can be used by others who are threatened; a technical access-to-information rule can improve how much people understand what is happening in their community.

Sometimes social movements succeed; sometimes they do not. The editor and writers hope the contribution of Civil Society in West Maui encourages people to recognize that such political activities have taken place—and that the struggles for a just society continue.

An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By visiting and/or participating in library programming, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19. Please help keep each other healthy.

If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library 7 days prior to the program date. We will make every attempt to fulfill all requests for accommodations. All programs are subject to change.

Toys coming out of head

Makerspace, crafting, art, sewing, tinkering, – it all adds up to using your creativity and imagination!  Join us every first Tuesday of the month for this fun, drop in, after school program! Materials, toys and tools will be available to learn, create, explore, collaborate, and share. Materials will vary month to month. Recommended for ages 8 – 16.

An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By visiting and/or participating in library programming, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19. Please help keep each other healthy.

If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library 7 days prior to the program date. We will make every attempt to fulfill all requests for accommodations. All programs are subject to change.

 

Join us! Meet author Brian Richardson who will share and discuss his book Index to the Lahaina News (1979-2003), The Lahaina Sun (1970-19736), and the Lahaina Times (1980-1983, limited issues).

Brian, a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Librarian compiled the index with a grant from the HK West Maui Community Fund. “Indexes are important, especially for newspapers, because they provide access points to documents that would not be easily accessible,” said Richardson. “The structure created by an index helps to organize the overall content of what would otherwise be an unmanageable and overwhelming collection of text.”

The index provides a snapshot of West Maui through editorial and corporate lens of the local newspaper. It allows one to trace the civil, social, and political and landscape changes of Lahaina over recent decades – hotels, tourism and real estate, while sporadically mentioning land rights, Hawaiian sovereignty, and poverty and social issues.

An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By visiting and/or participating in library programming, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19. Please help keep each other healthy.

If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library 7 days prior to the program date. We will make every attempt to fulfill all requests for accommodations. All programs are subject to change.

Hours

Date Time
Monday CLOSED - CLOSED
Tuesday 12:00PM-5:00PM & 6:00PM-7:00PM -
Wednesday 9:00AM-1:00PM & 2:00PM-4:00PM -
Thursday 9:00AM-1:00PM & 2:00PM-4:00PM -
Friday 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Saturday 9::00-AM-1:00PM & 2:00PM-4:00PM -
Sunday CLOSED - CLOSED

Access

Parking spots 7
Parking fee Free
Handicap parking spots 1
Book drop off Yes
Restrooms Yes

Services

Computers 8
Magazines 132
Newspapers 11
WiFi Yes
Friends' book store No
Free computer classes Yes
Meeting rooms No
Photocopying Yes
Test proctoring services Yes

ALERT | ALL LOCATIONS CLOSED TODAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2022
All Hawaii State Public Library System locations are closed today, September 26, out of an abundance of caution due to an unspecified threat. The library has been working with local law enforcement to determine when it is safe to reopen.